Lollius, Authorial Omnipotence, Chaucer

Richard Utz: “‘As writ myn auctour called Lollius’: Divine and Authorial Omnipotence in Chaucer’s Troilus and Criseyde.” In: Nominalism and Literary Discourse: New Perspectives. Ed. Hugo Keiper, R. Utz, and Christoph Bode. Critical Studies, 10. Amsterdam: Rodopi, 1997. 123-44.

Grover Furr, The Medieval Review (1999): “Richard Utz is perhaps the foremost exponent of the “paradigm” of Nominalist influence upon late Medieval English literature. His own book and the collection of essays which he edited in 1995, are among the leading causes of the revival of interest by literary scholars in the influence of Nominalism. [Utz, in “‘As Writ Myn Auctor Called Lollius’: Divine and Authorial Omnipotence in Chaucer’s Troilus and Criseyde,”] uses the old scholarly debate over the identity of “Lollius” to push forward the argument […] that Nominalism freed Chaucer from analogy, from a dependence upon strict allegory. […] Never pressing his case beyond what can be convincingly demonstrated, Utz gives us a model of a nuanced and convincing affirmation of Nominalist influence on Chaucer.”